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Taking Cancer Research up a NOTCH

Usually, we discuss newly published cancer research for the journal club. Next weekend, we will discuss a new way for training physicians to organize and conduct research. What happens when trainees don’t have to depend upon their training institution for opportunities?

On August 15-16, we will discuss the development of a trainee-led research program in the United Kingdom. Our article is an editorial outlining the idea and its early success, “NOTCH: The National Oncology Trainees Collaborative for Healthcare Research

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clon.2020.05.005

Please join us in welcoming authors Dr. Chris Jones, Dr. Anna Olsson-Brown, and Dr. Caroline Dobeson to discuss NOTCH and the potential of a novel approach to cancer research.

Our chat will begin 8AM Central Standard Time on Saturday August 15th and continue into Sunday to permit global participation. The article is open access now and available for download here thanks to Clinical Oncology.

Here are our topic questions:

T1.  What are the barriers training oncologists encounter in learning about how to conduct research?   

T2.  How did the original Northern Oncology version of NOTCH first come into being? What needs did it address?

T3. How did NOTCH develop its structure to support trainee-led research projects? Please explain some of the key features for how the process works.

T4. Both the selected research projects and the organization require a commitment of human and financial capital. How does NOTCH fund selected research projects and sustain the collaborative program’s continued growth?

T5.  The organization has already supported successful research projects recognized for its quality. Does trainee-led research differ in certain ways from more traditional cancer research?

T6. It is challenging to obtain the experience and skills needed for a successful academic career even in mentor-led research. How does NOTCH’s advisory group help ensure that a trainee-led process not only produces research but also helps train oncologists for an academic career track?

T7. Does NOTCH include any non-traditional resources for trainees participating? Are non-academic doctors, other health professionals, or patients involved in advising or contributing to NOTCH?

T8. The regional version of NOTCH is now a national program. Has the model proven scalable? What are the benefits and challenges of expanding?

T9. If trainees in another part of the world wanted to develop something similar to NOTCH, what are the three most important factors you recommend to succeed?

Here are guidelines on how to sign up and participate

  • Read our disclaimer for ways to keep it rewarding and professional. If you’re not ready, just lurk and tune into the conversation.
  • Feel free to add the respective diseases site tags to your tweets to share with the appropriate cancer community on twitter. Just don’t forget the #radonc #jc tags!

Any suggestions? Leave a comment or tweet us at @Rad_Nation. Looking forward to seeing everyone this weekend!

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